Coenzyme Q10 (ubichinone)
Coenzyme Q10 (ubichinone)

Coenzyme Q10 (ubichinone)

What is coenzyme Q10?

The new star of mitochondrial therapy, coenzyme Q10 is a vitamin-like compound and a major contributor to the generation of energy at the cellular level. Like vitamins, it performs a vital function in our bodies. Coenzymes support the activity of enzymes, but unlike enzymes they are themselves used up in the process and must therefore be regularly replaced. And unlike vitamins, coenzymes can be produced by the body itself. But in times of increased need for coenzymes (e.g. during sporting activity), the body's own production of coenzyme Q10 may no longer suffice. The supply of this coenzyme would then need to be increased via nutrition or nutritional supplements.

Other names for coenzymes Q10 are ubiquinone 10, UQ, Q and Q-10

Structure of coenzyme Q10 [ubiquinone]

The name ubiquinone derives from the fact that, to a certain extent, coenzyme Q10 is available everywhere (i.e. ubiquitous) in all human, animal and plant cells, and from a chemical point of view has a ring-like quinone structure.

Thanks to its lipophilic ('fat-loving') side chain, coenzyme Q10 possesses fat-soluble properties. We therefore find this coenzyme mostly in our membranes – in the skin, in our cells and in the cells' 'organs', the organelles. It therefore follows that coenzyme Q10 is particularly important for the mitochondria.